Dressember

Amy Wing Scannell

You do not have to be a super advocate. This phrase from Blythe Hill’s Ted Talk gave me permission to let out a long exhale. Because it is a lot.  There are a lot of causes for which I want to champion; there is a lot of inequity in the world I wish to solve, and by the way, CLIMATE CHANGE, THE EARTH IS MELTING(!), but you know what? I am also tired. And a human.  I am guessing we share that in common.  There are great injustices in this world, how can we possibly feel empathy and give a voice to all of them? Sometimes it seems easier to instead choose nothing.

You do not have to be a super advocate. Instead, we make (approximately) a thirty-five thousand choices throughout the day, why not try to make a positive impact with just one of those choices? Recently one of my impacting choices has been to stop saying that there are injustices that just seem too big to solve and to stop burrowing my head in the sand.

My head was abruptly pulled out of the metaphorical sand on a recent trip to Florida.  I landed in Fort Lauderdale and walked into the restroom at the airport. There on the wall was a sign that read, “ATTENTION: HUMAN TRAFFICKING NOTICE.” There was a number below for a National Human Trafficking Resource Center (1-888-373-7888).  This sign surprised me, and then I immediately felt guilty for being surprised.  Human trafficking is an epidemic; about 2 million children are currently exploited in the commercial sex trade, human trafficking generates $150 billion per year, and over 30 million people are enslaved worldwide.  There absolutely needs to be a sign offering help to victims of forced labor in an airport, a prime location to transport and exploit primarily women and children.

Truthfully, while that sign has been in the back of my mind, I did not believe there was anything big or impressive enough for me to do for victims of human trafficking to make a difference.

You do not have to be a super advocate. You can just be you. And I can just be me.  And I will be participating in Dressember, a style challenge to wear a dress for 31 days in December.  Participating in Dressember by fundraising and wearing a dress for 31 days serves as a conversation starter to educate the community and those I interact with, on a daily basis, about the prevalence of human trafficking. I am reassured that the funds donated to Dressember are part of strategic anti-trafficking grants.  Funds are used to provide the means to create and build victim relief programs that make a lasting impact through specifically vetted partners like Saving Innocence, Pathfinders, and YouthSpark, to name a few.

One small act of advocacy on the part of many moves the needle of change forward.  Please click the link below to read more about Dressember , join our team to make an impact or to donate to Team Golden Rule Boutique’s Dressember challenge.

One small act of advocacy on the part of many moves the needle of change forward.  Please click the link below to read more about Dressember , join our team to make an impact or to donate to Team Golden Rule Boutique’s Dressember challenge. The Golden Rule Boutique team has a goal of $6,719 which is what would fully fund a complete rescue operation. Does that number feel intimidating? A mere 20$ funds an aftercare kit to help a survivor feel loved and cared for after transitioning out of exploitation. Use the link above to learn how far your dollar can go, whether it be legal services and trial fees or towards education and training, every bit helps. The Golden Rule Boutique team is excited that together we can figuratively stop burrowing our heads in the sand when it comes to the global issue of human trafficking.

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Comments (1)

  • Tim Wing
    Tim Wing December 3, 2018 at 1:38 pm

    Don’t you get stinky wearing the same dress for a month?

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